Welcome to the

Minnich Group

Our group develops microwave and millimeter-wave instrumentation for applications in radio astronomy and quantum information science. We work at the intersection of engineering, materials science, and physics.
 

Group News

Latest publications

Happenings

Adrian and Erika contribute to paper on an imaginary time evolution algorithm for quantum computers. Nov. 17, 2019

Peishi publishes paper on thermal transport properties in polythiophene. Sept. 17, 2019

Yang publishes paper on electronic structure of nickel oxide and manganese oxide using coupled cluster theory. Apr. 27, 2020

Austin's work on anharmonic localization in lead selenide published as an APS science highlight here.

Feb. 18, 2020

Jaeyun successfully defends his thesis!

Congratulations Dr. Moon!

Dec. 11, 2019

Research

 

Answering fundamental questions in physics and cosmology requires precision in measurement at or beyond the standard limits imposed by quantum mechanics. Our group’s overarching goal is to advance the science and technology of measurement that allows these questions to be answered. 

Low noise transistor microwave amplifiers

We are developing transistor microwave amplifiers used in radio astronomy and other fields that operate near the standard quantum limit of noise. Read more here.

Electronic structure and transport theory in materials

We are advancing and applying ab-initio methods to understand the microscopic origins of noise in solids as well as identify materials for measurement technologies. Read more here.

Quantum simulation and sensing

We are exploring how emerging devices that manipulate quantum information can be used for quantum simulation and sensing. Read more here

 

Principal Investigator

Austin J. Minnich

Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Physics

Professional Preparation

BS University of California Berkeley, 2006

MS Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2008

PhD Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2011 

Appointments

Professor, California Institute of Technology, 2017-Present

Assistant Professor, California Institute of Technology, 2011-2017

Click here for a copy of Austin's CV

Current group members

BS, University of Chicago

Research interests: Quantum simulation, quantum algorithms

Joined group: 2019
BS, University of Texas at Arlington

Research interests: Electronic fluctuations, low-noise amplifiers.

Joined group: 2019
BS, Georgia Tech

Research interests: Excited states in correlated solids, coupled cluster method.

Joined group: 2019
BS, National University of Singapore

Research interests:
Quantum dynamics, tensor networks.

Joined group: 2018
BS, Georgia Tech

Research interests:
Electronic fluctuations, low-noise amplifiers.

Joined group: 2018
BSE, University of Connecticut

Research interests:
Electronic fluctuations, Langevin dynamics, low-noise amplifiers.

Joined group: 2017
BS, University of Florida

Research interests:
Transport in molecular crystals from first principles.

Joined group: 2016
BS, University of Science and Technology of China

Research interests:
Excited states in correlated solids, coupled cluster method.

Joined group: 2017
BS, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Research interests:
Quantum dynamics, tensor networks.

Joined group: 2016
BS, University of Connecticut

Research interests:
Cell-free expression, synthetic cells, trans-membrane channels.

Joined group: 2016
BS, Yonsei University

Research interests:
Phonon transport, transient grating spectroscopy.

Joined group: 2015
Show More

Click here to see our group alumni.

 

Teaching

APh 250/ME 201: Microwave noise in semiconductor electronic devices

Course description: What do radio telescopes, quantum computers, and deep space communication have in common? The transistor microwave amplifier! Low noise amplifiers are a key technology that allow weak signals to be processed and analyzed. The noise above the standard quantum limit added by these amplifiers thus represents a basic limit to the accuracy of a measurement. 

 

This course will provide a comprehensive overview of the physical origin of noise mechanisms in transistor amplifiers and how they may be mitigated. Specific topics to be covered include:

  • Mathematical description of stochastic processes and fundamental noise sources

  • Equivalent circuit noise model of field-effect and bipolar junction transistors

  • Non-equilibrium noise mechanisms including hot electron noise

 

Prerequisites: Basic knowledge of circuits and semiconductor physics.

 

If interested, contact instructor for more details or register on REGIS!

For previously taught courses, click here.

Week 1 Class Notes: 

 

P: (626)-395-3385

F: (626)-583-4963

Minnich Lab

1200 E. California Blvd, M.C. 104-44

Pasadena, CA 91125